Sri Lanka, an island floating in the blue waters of the Indian Ocean and the Bay of Bengal surrounded by golden beaches and the beaches in Sri Lanka are the best in the world. The most beautiful, wide and sandy beaches can be found .The South Coast has pockets of wide beaches Nov – April and lagoons for safe all year round swimming but generally the South coast suffers with the seasons and many beaches narrow off April – October.

Sri Lanka has an enviable record of animal conservation, from the founding of a flora and fauna reserve at Mihintale, at the birth of Buddhism in the 3rd century BC, to the establishment of the many sanctuaries and National Parks at the present day. There are several National Parks you can visit in Sri Lanka. Yala is the largest national park. The National Parks of Sri Lanka are managed by the department of Wild Life and Conservation. National Parks are bit different from Wild Life sanctuaries which allow free movements. You need to obtain permission and a guide provided by the park. You are not supposed to get out from the vehicle under any circumstances. You need drive a 4 WD vehicle and stay only in specified roads. Sri Lanka is a paradise for animal lovers who enjoy animal or bird watching which offer you an opportunity to observe a real wildlife once in your lifetime. The animals to be seen in Sri Lanka’s national parks include elephant, leopard, sloth bear, Sāmbhar, deer and monkeys, wild buffalo, wild boar (pig), porcupine, ant-eater, civet cat, jackal, mongoose, lories (unique to Sri Lanka) several varieties of lizards, squirrels, reptiles and amphibians. Each park however has its own specialties. Sri Lanka has a rich and exotic variety of wildlife and a long tradition of conservation rooted in its 2,230 year old Buddhist civilization.p>

The island’s southernmost point, has the distinction of being the best-preserved sea fort in South Asia. A living heritage site, this 90 hectare (222 acre) attraction is a superb blend of architecture, with fortifications that resemble those in the coastal areas of Portugal. The fall of Galle to the Dutch in 1640 saw its fortifications consolidated further along the lines of the fortified cities of Europe. The Dutch and the English colonial styles are evident in the deep verandahs of houses supported by timber or masonry pillars. Originally established by the Portuguese in the 16th Century.